Lessons Learned on the Journey – Part 2

I can imagine you might be wondering how the plan to downsize is going? (Subject of my last post) Dianne and I have been working on it for a year and a half now.  I’ve drawn some conclusions, (but probably have as many questions as conclusions). As I stated before, the downsizing process involves settling on a new understanding of the rhythm of life.

By this I mean “what we value…and how we choose to pursue what we value, whether things or relationships. The value we place on these dictates the pace we maintain to possess them. It’s what we value and how we seek fulfillment.” Thinking about that pursuit forms the picture in my mind of Gollum in Lord of the Rings. Gollum was the Hobbit who was driven to possess the ring and what it could do for him, …at any cost. Ultimately, it cost him his own life. It literally destroyed him.

I have come to realize the objects of my affection, the stuff I’ve collected, sticks to me like gum on the bottom of my shoe. They can become an idol, a false god. In holding my affections I become a slave to my own choices. The things I pursue become my master.

Here are some things I’ve discovered about this rhythm of life.

  • It’s a liminality I can control. I can control it because I created it. Since to downsize is my choice, those choices abide under my own authority and management. Do I let them control me or do I have the will to demand they sublimate to my authority?
  • Contentment plays a large role in my attitude and motivation to stay the course of downsizing. It opens the door to tranquility, challenging me to accept contentment…divest myself of all the frenetic activity required to maintain it.
  • There is the inner drive to create beauty and the environment of serenity and peace. To have things look nice, ordered, is restful, even worshipful. I am drawn to God in loving response; to see him in all his beauty; the God of order and beauty who created everything we call beautiful.
  • Shrinkage of stuff can cause expansion of soul. I take more time to be intentional, to ponder and think about things I otherwise would not have time for.
  • This rhythm of life is a gem, unpolished and unshaped. On my mental work bench, I contemplate its every facet. It affords me constant opportunity to go deeper in myself. I grow in understanding, aiding the possibility of permanent implementation in my life.
  • Our personality conditions and guides our response to all this. I’m task and goal oriented. It’s natural for me to focus on all this, to organize it, to order it in to a goal – to let it become the way forward. It’s the path for me to walk.

There is a great German word that catches the spirit of what I’m saying. “Torschlusspanik” This word speaks of the fear that time is running out as I get older. I need not fear time when I have slowed myself down and am less encumbered by the stuff I think I need and the pace I need to keep up to maintain it.

A refreshing consequence of downsizing is a slower and more ordered pace of life. I want to continue to learn to smell the roses and enjoy doing so.  How about you?

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Lessons Learned on the Journey – part 1

The Knight Errant is back…after an hiatus of wandering to and fro on the earth,  campaigning for justice, slaying dragons and rescuing fair damsels in distress. 🙂  Ah, it’s a rewarding life I lead.

One of the benefits of getting old is knowing yourself and coming to grips with it. Dianne read about a marketing study done by an ice cream manufacturer. They actually can tell who you are and target you for marketing by knowing what flavor you prefer. For instance, Dianne likes pralines and caramel. I like cookie dough. She read that her choice suggests she is a person who  is more likely to be loving, supportive and prefer to avoid the spotlight. My flavor says I am a person who is more likely to be ambitious, competitive and a visionary. We guffawed loudly. How can this be? They are so right. If you’re curious about yourself, you might want to follow this link.

http://www.theblaze.com/stories/2013/07/19/what-your-favorite-ice-cream-flavor-says-about-you/?utm_source=facebook&utm_medium=story&utm_campaign=Share+Buttons

In this stage as a senior, Dianne and I have made significant changes in life style. We’re seeking a new “rhythm of life.” Knowing ourselves is part of this pursuit to find our proper rhythm. We’ve moved out of our home and voluntarily become homeless. We are living in 3 worlds, splitting our time at our cabin in the mountains, our home in the city and trekking for Jesus in ministry in Europe. Let me explain what I mean when I refer to a new “rhythm of life.”

As I said, getting older, I know myself much better now. I’ve learned certain lessons in life. One such lesson is to value the right things. That’s not to say I do it 100% of the time. But choices must always be made. So on what basis do I make those choices? Seems choices are made for 2 reasons. 1. what is required of me by others, by circumstances.     2. ultimately by what I value. The object of my affection is the choice I make to pursue.

The new rhythm requires downsizing. Having to downsize was a choice of value selection. Having downsized in  2 stages, the first being done, I’m on the path to seek a new “rhythm of life.” The process of selection with the goal of reducing life and the possession of things, has created the recognition of what is basic and  germain to my existence. I choose to select elements that I will maintain and let others go. These become the basic elements, the essential ingredients of how I live life. And the process of choosing forces me to hold on to fewer of those elements I once thought necessary to life.

Forty eight years of marriage and collecting the stuff consumerism seduces me to obtain, ultimately produced many layers on top and around my inner core. Over time I began to believe it’s those things I must maintain. All this has produced a rhythm of life I’m tempted to believe I cannot live without. The process of downsizing forces me to consider a new reality…one which I discover is a new rhythm. It’s a rhythm that’s reduced in the size and amount of stuff and the time I devote to maintaining it. It’s a rhythm that’s slower paced, the blessing of which is inner peace, tranquility and the focus of joy; the joy the Holy Spirit wants me to have, the joy he will give me.

There is an unintended consequence to making the choice(s) to downsize. The right choices provide a serendipitous blessing; that blessing is the opportunity to respond more freely to what God wants for me. In my new rhythm I find the joy of his abiding presence.

My challenge then,  is to find this “rhythm of life” and live within it. Sorry to say I still have to work on it. But I’m trying, and when I do I’m finding it rewarding…worth the effort.

I’ll come back with some more thoughts about all this next time. I’ll present a definition for you to ponder. In the meantime, take the challenge to consider a new rhythm for yourself.

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Balancing Life’s Circumstances

In its day, “The Music Man” musical was a broadway hit, winning many awards. From that musical we received the song “Ya Got Trouble”. The song showcases “Professor” and con man Harold Hill, who convinces the citizens of this small town the new recreation of pool will lead to nothing but degradation and immorality of the youth of the town. He thus cons them to allow him to teach them to play an instrument and form a marching band. His diabolical plan all along is only to bilk them of their money, then disappear. This whimsical look at a simpler time is pure lighthearted merriment. However, there is a strain of truth that seeps in to the current of our own day. Whether years or centuries past, we are tied to these same ills that plague our society as well. Truly, corruption, injustice and violence are with us permanently. They are the results of our old sin nature. That nature is pervasive, universal.

I’ve read and re-read the OT book of Habbakuk recently. There is an interesting parallel of the prophet’s day to our day, as I see it. The prophet was troubled by the same issues we face…injustice, violence and evil seemingly swallowing up righteousness. After Habbakuk complains twice, he then resolves to take his post of normal responsibility in daily life and wait for God’s response to his questions. “I will take my stand at my watch post and station myself on the tower, and look out to see what he will say to me, and what I will answer concerning my complaint.” 2:1

Here are some observations I want to make, pointing us to applications for ourselves. There is a readiness in his waiting. He says, he will, from his post, “look out to see what he (God) will say to me.” What is not told us is how long he would wait to hear. That is usually my first question. Implicit in his resolve is a commitment to wait…(now here’s the hard part),… without end…if God should so choose. He is poised to respond to whatever God says, whenever he says it.

This is “active waiting!” It’s acceptance of God’s will and his will to be done.  From the outset of his prayer and plea to God for answers, he is committed to wait to hear what God will say. This is anticipation and faith,But it’ not blind faith, It’s faith based in the nature and character of God. It shows us ultimate trust and confidence in the nature and purpose of God for our lives and for others as well. His decision to trust God is a reflection on his own character and level of maturity. It’s a willingness to place himself and his good in the hands of a sovereign God. He assumes the righteous God will balance the scales of justice and violence. His final prayer reveals this. …”I will quietly wait for the day of trouble to come upon people who invade us.” 3:16

In the end he affirms his willingness to accept whatever God does because he is a good, benevolent and righteous God. He accepts the worst case scenario – should that be – as God’s sovereign will. God is his strength even making him run with the swiftness and dexterity of a deer. “Though the fig tree should not blossom, nor fruit be on the vines, the produce of the olive fail and the fields yield no food, the flock be cut off from the fold and there be no herd in the stall, yet I will rejoice in the Lord: I will take joy in the God of my salvation. God, the Lord, is my strength: he makes my feet like deer’s; he makes me tread on high places.” 3:17-19

There must be activity in the waiting process. I see it like a man in the ocean treading water, bobbing up and down, constantly moving his feet to stay afloat, yet never moving, accept by what movement happens because of the current. His waiting cannot be passive or he would drown.

What’s the lesson for us? Wait actively. Trusting God for the outcome and willingness to accept whatever that will be. Maybe I should also say, and whenever that might be!

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2 Perspectives on Christmas

2 Perspectives on Christmas

The result of living in 2 worlds as I do, often has me confused. When I’m in Europe I feel very much like a European, (whatever that is). When I return to the US, I sometimes wonder if I belong here. Things change a lot. Those changes take place in a relatively short period of time. Our American culture is in constant, frenetic change. That’s why I get confused about where I belong.

Dianne and I were in Europe 6 weeks this fall. We returned home Nov 20th, just in time for Thanksgiving. We assumed when we came back home, we would have Thanksgiving as usual, then do our Christmas shopping. To our surprise, Christmas shopping had been in season through most of the fall already. The result being things were picked over, store shelves starting to look bare. Imagine our dismay at this early attack on Christmas. (The turkey was hardly cold.) I’m old enough to have experienced and remember Christmas only after Thanksgiving.

Adding insult to injury, for me, is the ubiquitous Christmas kitsch in the yards of my neighbors. Now I ask you, what do swans, blow up Santas, palm trees, even pigs have to do with Christmas? I confess I have an attitude to deal with.

My perspective? Our consumerism is driving our behavior and setting the norm for our culture. We’re being swept along in the swift current of consumerism.  I find this repugnant, disgusting. I want something better for our culture, my family and I. I don’t expect to live in a Christian bubble, nor to hold those outside my beliefs to feign an artificial faith. You can’t legislate righteousness. I know Jesus said he was hated and we should expect to be hated too.

So, what will I do? I will make a statement to my neighbors, at least, by erecting a biblical scene of Christmas with life size models of the holy family and an angel to proclaim the good news. I like the sound of that already. I can’t wait for the characters I ordered to arrive so I can set it up. By the way, it took a Christian family who owns a national chain of stores to make these figures of the real Christmas available. I certainly could not find anything of the right Christmas sort otherwise. Isn’t it odd that in secular Europe, you can still find plenty of real Christmas scenes?

My second perspective? One of my bible heroes is Joseph; the earthly father of Jesus. I read again the story of the birth of Jesus from Matthew, chapters 1 & 2. A powerful story of a man of honor, integrity, obedience, love, graciousness, trust, ….and I could go on and on. I have always identified with Joseph. He stands in the background of most manger scenes giving silent approval, in quiet submission to all taking place, willing to accept his lot, his role as human enabler, hovering over the family to protect, create security, encourage and point the way. His prominence to be seen, to be acknowledged, is swallowed up in submission to the greater good of everyone else. He is only important as he gives way to others; only as he allows them to be the focus. Their lives and their future makes him subservient to them. Thus his impact on the family is accomplished only as he submits to his unique calling.

The Word Made Flesh, by  Marcia Carole Gladwish, Original Pencil Drawing

The Word Made Flesh, by Marcia Carole Gladwish, Original Pencil Drawing

It would take a strong man of Godly character to do what God laid on him. I noted 3 times in Matthew, Joseph receives an angel in his dreams to divinely direct the plan of our Sovereign God. Joseph wasn’t an extraordinary man. But he was a man tuned in to God’s voice and willing to suffer for the sake of God’s divine plan and on behalf of his family, and for all of mankind. He’s a super hero in my book.

So what will I do? I am resolved to emulate Joseph,… those qualities I have mentioned. I want all those qualities embedded in my life and characteristic of me, from head to foot. As a committee of one, this is my resolve. As Martin Luther said, “here I stand, I can do no other.”

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The Merits of Journaling

I’ve learned over time, I need to pause, (regularly), reflect, and draw conclusions about the direction I’m going in life. My nature drives me to a kind of “helter-skelter” response to life and ministry. I could easily exist just reacting to life in order to do what I do. I could go through life and seldom give it thought or planning. Yes, the recognition of my tendencies has not come easily. In truth, understanding myself has come over time and through painful experiences.

When my son was killed in September, 1992, my life was hit by a tsunami! It was a tidal wave of overwhelming emotions. Dealing with my pain and the beginnings of a lifetime of grief work, I began to journal…every day. (My wife is a lifetime “journaler.” Dianne had encouraged me for years to do this kind of reflection. I tried several times but found it “unnatural” and never worked at it consistently.)

But, I began to journal, pouring out my heart to God, reaching deep inside myself to grab hold of every emotion and every thought, in order to make sense out of life. I pondered, prayed, I wept, I wrestled with truth, I sought understanding of sin and violence…and much, much more. I found from my earliest days of journaling, liberation in the process of reflection and evaluation of my life. I found an open door to freedom for myself and freedom from myself. This was great personal reward.

Now 20 years later, and nearly 40 books completed, I still journal. (I use journals made in to books, but you can use anything you wish.) Few are the days I do not begin in the morning by reading my bible and journaling…with a cup of coffee on the table beside me. I have a special place at my house where I sit and special pens I use, …(all fountain pens. I really like and collect them. I imagine myself a little like CS Lewis with a fountain pen in my hand. My imagination is the closest I will ever be.)

I now include sermon ideas, responses to scripture, and ponderings of various kinds. Sometimes I write poems, I draw pictures, charts and diagrams. Anything I want to process is included. I started to color code things according to subject so that I can find them easily. I still comb through years of journals to remind myself of things I’ve experienced, or ideas I’ve considered. All these ideas and more are possible.

Journaling is an excellent way to monitor your own life. It’s keeping an accurate record of God at work. When you can’t see the immediate picture you can look back over your own recorded observations and trace his hand in ways you would not remember without it. Jeremiah says to us in Lamentations 3:21-23, “This I call to mind, and therefore I have hope: the steadfast love of the Lord never ceases, his mercies never come to an end; they are new every morning, great is your faithfulness.” (By the way, without biblical writers who journaled we would not have some portions of scripture. Think of David and the Psalms, for instance.) This grand narrative, (of my life), becomes a way to minister to my progeny and future generations. I want to influence future generations from my grave, a written record of my life is the only way to do so.

Embedded here in my testimony, are the reasons I believe journaling is imperative for a person to mature in Christ, grow as persons, become all God’s wants them to be. My choice of where, when and how I do this is not the only way. Some people use their computer to record all they want to say. The point is, take seriously this “journaling discipline”. I challenge/ encourage you to join me. First, decide how you will do it, then…do it! I guarantee, you will not be disappointed nor find it a waste of time.

PS
Let me know how it goes for you.

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Hearing but not always Listening

Hearing but not always Listening

I know from experience it’s possible to hear someone speak to you but not listen to what’s being said. Many times in my life I have been guilty of hearing but not listening. In casual conversation this could be just an innocuous ignoring what someone says. But not listening can become a major issue when a person chooses to not tune in to the conversation of others. This is especially true when advice, opinions and counsel are being given but the one asking is not listening.

Not listening can be a habit. But, not listening can also be a choice, the choice to ignore what’s being said. To ignore advice and counsel from others who hold a different perspective or who hold a dissenting view can have devastating results. Consider this example from the OT.

King Solomon died. (Now here’s irony for you). The wisest man who ever lived – the richest man of his days – left a legacy of exacting harsh taxation on the people he ruled. When his son Rehoboam ascended the throne, he was approached by a delegation of the people to request leniency of taxation with a promise to serve him all their days. Rehoboam’s response was to ask them for time to consider what they requested, to return to him in 3 days for his answer. In the meantime, Rehoboam inquired of the elders who had served his father, but he chose to follow the counsel of his own peers…”the young men he had grown up with.” (I Kings 12) He took their advice and, “the King didn’t listen to the people.” When they returned to hear from Rehoboam, he stunned them with his intractable refusal to lighten the load choosing instead to increase it even more.
Civil war broke out. The kingdom was divided with 10 tribes in the north, following Jeroboam and 2 tribes in the south, following Rehoboam. Israel in the north never had a Godly king after that. Judah in the south, intermittently, had only a handful of Godly kings. The results of this decision have affected Israel to this day.

There are often unintended consequences for a person who ignores counsel from those who hold a dissenting opinion. When we seek counsel from those we know agree with us, the end result is often disastrous. It seems to me, seeking counsel from people we know will tell us what we want to hear, is to run headlong in to foolishness. Rehoboam, case in point. His refusal to listen engendered revolution. His people were plunged in to chaos.

 Speaking of irony. It was this same wise man, Solomon, who said “A wise man will hear and increase in learning. and a man of understanding will acquire wise counsel…”        Proverbs 1:5. To bad he either didn’t teach this to his son Rehoboam, or Rehoboam refused to learn it. With an attitude like his, I suspect Solomon tried to teach him, but the son heard and never listened.

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What Slogans Tell Us, (About Ourselves)

 

What Slogans Tell Us, (About Ourselves)

 

 

I love a good phrase. A well-constructed thought, carefully but succinctly stated, is a beautiful thing. I try to do it a lot, but seldom ever come up with one of those pithy statements myself, …the kind others quote. Yet my predisposition to find them causes me to notice them.

Traveling in Europe, moving in and out of 10 countries on my spring ministry trip, I found quite a few fascinating and intriguing phrases. Advertising phrases are to be found on bill- boards, signs, posters, even t-shirts. On a t-shirt in the airport last night I saw this slogan, “In the darkness I find myself.” That caused me to ponder. A poster said, “You have no past, only a future.” Wow. Think about those statements. I only know who I am in secret, in the dark? I have no past thus am not responsible for anything I have done? I don’t think so!

Poignancy is one thing, but humanistic philosophies are another. Pondering why someone would wear such items on their clothing I assume they either don’t know what they are wearing, (never giving it any thought), or they are truly espousing that philosophy. Either way I’m troubled as I contemplate this person and why they are wearing such things.

I remember when I lived in Europe, an auto company marketed their cars in Germany with this slogan, “Der Weg ist Das Ziel.” Translated, that means “the way is the destination.” In other words, where you are going is of little interest as long as you are going in our auto, because our auto is so much fun, gives you so much pleasure, it doesn’t really matter where you’re going. Just do it and you’ll be glad you did. This hedonistic perspective highlights much of our western way of thinking, Americans and Europeans alike. It’s an emphasis on the temporary, self- rewarding, be good to yourself attitude we espouse.

Hard for me to imagine Jesus having the disciples pass out t-shirts after he taught them in the Sermon on the Mount.  Can you see this, Jesus, the disciples and the crowd sitting on the hillside in Galilee, when the disciples pass through the crowd dispensing free t-shirts saying things like, “Come to Jesus and be filled.” Or, “Come to Jesus and get fed, new life and great bread.” And many such sayings.

It seems to me Jesus cut to the quick of this attitude as he taught us in the Sermon on the Mount, in Matt 6:33. “ But seek first the kingdom of God and his righteousness, and all these things will be added to you.

 

The difference between the idea of temporary satisfaction and eternal values is significant. What we pursue in life should be commensurate with what we say we believe.

With tongue in cheek I say, if you have to wear a t-shirt, wear it inside out.  🙂

 

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